Tag Archives: simpleBGC

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We must first note that all CAME-TV gimbals are pre-programmed and quality-tested to function right out of the box. No additional software tuning or firmware upgrades should be necessary. However, if you would like to make minor tuning adjustments with the SimpleBGC software at your own accord- such as changing joystick speeds, decreasing motor power, etc. - we suggest that you first SAVE the gimbal's default, factory-programmed settings before making such changes.

Should something go wrong as you're making the changes, you can always revert back and load the original default profiles. And please note that the profiles that you save contain settings that are unique to your gimbal. Sharing these profiles with other gimbal owners is not advised and can make their gimbal inoperable.

And perhaps most importantly, under no circumstances do we advise upgrading your firmware. Doing so will wipe your settings and make your gimbal inoperable. The only way to potentially make it functional again would be to send it back to a CAME-TV support facility for repair (at your own cost if out of warranty).

[IMPORTANT NOTE:] Your saved Default Profile is configured to the default Firmware installed on your Gimbal. If you attempt to upgrade your firmware, the saved Default Profile will no longer be valid.

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Below is a list of authorized versions of the SimpleBGC GUI software to use with our CAME-TV gimbals. Instructions for connection and use can be found here. If you are unsure of which version below is appropriate for your gimbal, click HERE.

2.63 b0 Currently available for the CAME-Prophet gimbal only. Contact us if needed.

2.60 b4 Currently available for CAME-Prodigy and newer CAME-Optimus models only. Contact us if needed.

2.56 b7
GUI (Windows, OS X, Linux): SimpleBGC_GUI_2_56b7.zip (8Mb 20.01.2016)
User Manual (English): SimpleBGC_32bit_manual_2_5x_eng.pdf (1Mb 29.06.2016)

2.55b3
GUI (Windows, OS X, Linux): SimpleBGC_GUI_2_55b3.zip (7.95Mb 17.02.2015)

2.50b3
GUI (Windows, OS X, Linux): SimpleBGC_GUI_2_50b3.zip (8Mb 14.04.2015)
User Manual (English): SimpleBGC_32bit_manual_2_50_eng.pdf (1Mb 6.05.2015)

2.43b9
GUI (Windows, OS X, Linux): SimpleBGC_GUI_2_43b9.zip (6Mb 14.04.2015)
User Manual (English): SimpleBGC_32bit_manual_2_43_eng.pdf (813Kb 8.12.2014)

If you are in need of 2.60 b4, contact us first.

SimpleBGC GUI software is developed and provided by BasecamElectronics.com.

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Initially, you can download any version of the SimpleBGC software to connect to your gimbal. After your first successful connection, look at the version of the firmware on the screen (shown in green below). 

simplebgu_firmware_

Once you have verified the firmware version, you can go back and download the correct GUI version to match your firmware.

Typically, you will want the the software version whose number is equal or lower than the firmware version. For example, in the example above, since your gimbal has been programmed with a 2.56 b9 firmware, you will want to find a SimpleBGC software version that is equal or slightly lower than 2.56 b9. In this case, the closest software version available is 2.56 b7. You should always use the same GUI when configuring your gimbal. And most importantly, NEVER upgrade your firmware!!!

Download link for the SimpleBGC GUI software can be found here.

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IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: Please know that all CAME-TV gimbals come pre-programmed to properly function and stabilize right out of the box without the need for software tuning. However, if you choose to make adjustments using the SimpleBGC software, you do so at your own risk. If or when you choose to do so, we strongly urge you NOT to make any changes that are not recommended by us. Doing so may affect your gimbal's functionality, and may require you to send it into one of our facilities for repair at your own cost (if still under warranty). Before making any of the suggested changes below, we also advise that you save your current profiles once connecting and/or capture screenshots of each tab & profile.
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On the most part, the CAME-TV Single gimbal can be balanced and fully operated straight out-of-the box. However, with the introduction of encoders, the most minor tweaks in the SimpleBGU calibration software can cause the Single to act somewhat erratic. Unfortunately, there is no undo button, nor is there a singular factory reset switch that can bring your gimbal back to its original state.

However, there is a very specific, yet simple 5-minute process that you can follow in order to get your gimbal functional again. Essentially, it will allow you to start over from scratch and remove any uncharacteristic behavior that you may have accidentally triggered. Tech media reviewer and colleague MrCheesycam breaks down this process step by step in the video below.

Download the SimpleBGC software HERE.

Download the CAME-TV Single Default Restoration profile if you are using SimpleBGC GUI version 2.55 b3 HERE.

If you are using SimpleBGC GUI version 2.56 b7, then download and use the Restoration profile linked HERE.

Not sure which SimpleBGC version you need? Click HERE.

Please note that these restoration profiles are intended to work ONLY for the CAME-Single and will NOT work for any other gimbal model.

NOTE: If you are only experiencing minor problems with your gimbal such as light shaking and vibrations, DO NOT follow the process above. Simply lowering your Motor Power can help eliminate those problems, as referenced in this article.

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All CAME-TV gimbals have been designed to support numerous camera/lens setups. That is, as long as the overall payload does not exceed that particular gimbal's pre-determined weight capacity. However, it is also possible for a camera setup to be too light. When this happens, users may notice shaking, vibrating, and even noises coming from the motor of their gimbal. But don't panic!! Essentially, the gimbal's motors have been programmed to expect a slightly heavier payload and are just working a little bit harder than they have to.

A quick fix to this problem, would be simply to lower the Motor Power in the SimpleBGC software. But first, before making any changes, we advise archiving all of your current settings (ex: saving your profile or capturing screenshots). In the unlikely event that you may have to revert back to those values, you'll at least have your screenshots for reference. Once that's done, investigate the gimbal and find out which motor (Yaw, Pitch, or Roll) is giving you problems. Once you have determined the culprit, connect to the software and reduce the Motor Power settings accordingly. Step by step details can be found in the video below.

NOTE: For heavier camera setups, simply increase motor power settings instead of decreasing them.

During this motor power adjustment process, it is ok to turn on your gimbal and test functionality after applying changes. Please know that this is a trial & error process and it may take some time to find the perfect settings for your camera setup. And just as a reminder, once you're able to determine the correct settings in one profile to stabilize your gimbal, apply those settings to the remaining 2 profiles in the Basic Tab of the software.

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One of the more useful functions of any CAME-TV gimbal is the built-in joystick/remote control feature. Simply enough, the 2-axis joystick essentially allows you to do seemless panning and tilting movements while maintaining smooth and steady shots with the gimbal.

However, all gimbals come with a pre-programmed joystick speed that dictates how fast its movements are. And sometimes this default speed isn't ideal for the shot that you may want to execute. But luckily, speed can easily be adjusted using the SimpleBGC software. Full step-by-step details are shown in the video below.

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Gimbals can work with either one or two IMU sensors. One sensor is placed above the camera to track camera positions, and the second (optional) is typically mounted to the vertical frame post for tracking frame angles.

frame imu greyed out alexmos basecam simplebgc gimbal

If you are using a Dual IMU system and cannot click on the Frame IMU button, it's possible this option has been disabled. Click over to the Advanced Tab and change the option for Frame IMU to Below YAW. Next Click the Write button to save your changes.

frame IMU below Yaw disabled greyed out

Now return to the Basic Tab and try to select the Frame IMU button for your options.

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Brushless Motors can be wired to spin in clockwise or counterclockwise, and the software to control them can automatically change directions. Motors on Gimbals can also be mounted in many different ways, so the software needs to detect which way is the proper rotation for your setup. This is when you may need to use the Invert option under Motor Configuration.

Cametv Motor Invert configuration
IMAGE IS AN EXAMPLE. DO NOT COPY THESE INVERT OPTIONS DIRECTLY. FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

Before starting this process make sure you have the Sensor Orientation setup correctly. This information is required when checking Motor direction. If you are unsure about your Sensor positions, check this article.

Once you have your sensors setup correctly, follow the instructions in the video below to determine if any of your Motors require the Invert option selected for your Gimbal.

We understand that many people want to Tune their Gimbals for different characteristics. But instead of downloading and sharing profiles, Keep in mind that Profiles carry several settings that are unique to your system. Instead of downloading and installing complete Profiles just for PID settings, we suggest just changing your PID settings manually through the software. This way you don't affect other settings such as Motor Invert Options, RC Settings, Sensor Positions, Follow Modes, etc.